Navigating life events

Get the information you need to plan and protect yourself and your family as life changes.

Sharing your future—and your future goals

Sharing your life with someone you care about can mean sharing your financial planning with someone you care about too. The possibilities can be exciting, but sometimes challenging to sort out.

Let us help you focus your plans on the goals you want to reach—together

Something to think about

  • Revisit your goals

  • Review your budget

  • Get expert financial advice

  • Update your beneficiaries

  • Update your address

  • Talk to your partner about money

Are your loved ones saving too?

Wouldn’t it be great if your partner could take advantage of a bunch of the benefits you enjoy with your group retirement program? Or maybe even more?

Great news! If you’re an existing or previous Manulife group retirement member, the Manulife Personal Plan™ is available to you, your spouse, your adult children, and your parents.

Explore the Manulife Personal Plan

Are you saving enough for your retirement?

Set a goal to help you retire the way you want!

  • Get a plan and get motivated
  • Guidance and advice just for you
  • Know you're on track

A few good reads

What is estate planning?

Estate planning. Also known as: Writing down what you want to happen—to you, your loved ones, your money, and your stuff—in case of the unexpected. To make it easy, we’ve made you a playlist.
Read the viewpoint

Buying a home is one of the biggest purchases in your lifetime

Saving up a down payment, budgeting for your new mortgage payment, setting aside money for unexpected repairs—there’s a lot to plan for.

Let us help you feel ready and excited when you step over that threshold

Something to think about

  • Check up on your savings

  • Review your budget

  • Create an emergency fund

  • Give your savings a raise

  • Make the most of your plans

  • Update your address

Your group RRSP and the Home Buyers’ Plan

The Home Buyers’ Plan (HBP) is a Canadian program that allows first-time homebuyers to withdraw and pay back money from RRSPs—tax free!

Many organizations allow HBP withdrawals from their group RRSPs. If you’re saving for your first house, check your membership information for the rules around how your plan handles HBP withdrawals.

Explore group RRSPs

What happens when you take money out of your RRSP?

Taking money out of your retirement savings can be a temptation when big costs come up. Before you make the decision to pull money from your RRSP, it’s important to understand what it means for your savings.

A few good reads

Staying on top of your goals, plans, and savings can be tricky right now

There are few tasks in life more all consuming and ultimately rewarding than raising a family. So take a deep breath and pat yourself on the back. Then let's work together on how your savings can help your family reach its goals.

We’ll help you manage your money so you can take care of your family

Something to think about

  • Revisit your goals

  • Give your savings a raise

  • Automate saving

  • Update your beneficiaries

  • Work on your estate plan

  • Talk to your kids about money

Too busy to stay on top of your savings?

A ready-made approach to investing gets you the most help. All you have to do is pick the date you want to take your money out, or tell us how you feel about risk, and a fund manager takes it from there.

To learn more about the ready-made options available to you, check the information you got to help you join your program. It could have been a paper guide, a digital guide, or even a website.

Talk to an advisor about ready-made options

Even a small amount can make a big difference

See how adding a bit more to the amount you save each month can add a lot more to the amount you have to spend each month in retirement.

A few good reads

What is estate planning?

Estate planning. Also known as: Writing down what you want to happen—to you, your loved ones, your money, and your stuff—in case of the unexpected. To make it easy, we’ve made you a playlist.
Read the viewpoint

Group retirement and income plans during separation or divorce

Find the guidance you need to navigate the effects that separation or divorce can have on finances, starting with group retirement and income plans.

Getting separated or divorced can be emotional and complicated

What you’re going through can be difficult, and when it comes to the question of how separation or divorce affects group retirement and income plans, there’s no easy answer.

To get a better understanding of your rights and obligations, we can only direct you to an expert in family law. To get a better understanding of how to request information and have payments made from Manulife group retirement and income plans, read on.

What’s a plan’s division of value in a separation or divorce?

The value of a group retirement or income plan can be affected by separation or divorce. A former spouse or common-law partner may be entitled to all or a portion of the value of the plan. Typically, either the member of the plan or the former spouse or common law partner will work with us to obtain plan details and the entitlement value, and to arrange for the payout of the entitlement value as directed in the separation agreement or court order and transfer forms.

The calculation of the entitlement value—and what you need to submit to us for it—varies. This is complicated by the fact that:

  • Each province has its own legislation and processes
  • Each plan type has its own legislation and processes
  • Every personal situation is different

Because there’s no standard way to explain how it’ll work for you, it’s best to ask for guidance and advice from an expert in family law. Check our FAQ below for some online resources.

Your division of value request—step by step

Step 1 Request plan details and the statement of plan value

You ask us for plan details and the entitlement value, then use this information to decide whether to divide the assets of the plan as part of your settlement.

Requirements will vary depending on the type of plan, but you’ll usually need to:

a. Send us a request for a statement of plan value.

b. Provide:

  • The date you married or started living together
  • The date you separated.

Depending on the plan type and the applicable provincial legislation, you may need to provide proof of these dates.

c. Be sure everything you submit is complete, accurate, and signed as required.

d. Submit the above requirements:

  • Members—By using the Send document feature on the secure member site
  • Non-members—By mail

 Check the FAQ below for details on these submission options.

a. We review the materials you’ve sent.

b. We contact you to collect or provide anything else required by applicable legislation

a. We review the materials you’ve sent

b. We contact you to collect or provide anything else required by applicable legislation.

If you will divide the assets of the plan as part of your settlement.

Step 2 Asset division

You confirm to us your intent to divide the value of the plan and how much. We pay the settlement amount to the former spouse or common law partner’s plan as directed in the separation agreement or court order and on the transfer form, if applicable.

a. Complete the transfer forms, if applicable

b. Attach:

  • A certified copy of the separation agreement or court order
  • Depending on the plan type and the applicable provincial legislation, the completed required form

c. Be sure everything you submit is complete, accurate, and signed as required.

d. Submit the above:

  • Members—By using the Send documents feature on the secure member site
  • Non-members—By mail

Check the FAQ below for details on these submission options.

a. We review the materials you’ve sent.

b. We contact you to collect or provide anything else required by applicable legislation.

Receipt of the value on your end depends on the transfer or payment method you choose.

Separation and divorce FAQ

You might already have a lawyer or mediator helping you out. If not, learn more about the family justice services available in your province or territory.

The value of any workplace group retirement or income plan can be affected by a separation or divorce. The former spouse or common-law partner may be entitled to all or a portion of the plan’s value. The amount depends on the type of plan and the applicable legislation. For more information about the division of property, pensions, separation agreements, retirement plan protection, and debt in separation or divorce, visit your province or territory’s family law website. Then, and most important, contact an expert in family law for help.

The effect of separation or divorce on government pension plans can be, and often is, complicated. Don’t go it alone! Ask for guidance and advice from an expert in family law.

Canada Pension Plan (CPP)
No matter which province or territory you live in, benefits can be affected by separation or divorce. Learn more about CPP.

Quebec Pension Plan (QPP)
Benefits can be affected by separation or divorce. Learn more about QPP.

Old Age Security (OAS)
Because OAS is considered a personal entitlement, benefits typically aren’t partitioned; however, benefits or eligibility can be affected in other ways. Learn more about OAS.

Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS)
Because the GIS is considered a personal entitlement, benefits typically aren’t partitioned; however, benefits or eligibility can be affected in other ways. Learn more about GIS.

You must be the member of the group retirement program in question. To use Send documents:

1.     Sign in.

2.     Go to My Account > Send documents. If you don’t see My Account, go to Manage your plans instead.

To find the address you need, check our contact information.

Assets in a Spousal RRSP accumulated during the marriage or common-law relationship are typically included in the marital property. In accordance with the Income Tax Act (Canada), a Spousal Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) can be transferred to an RRSP if:

  • You or your former spouse or common-law partner are separated in accordance with a decree, order, or judgment of a competent tribunal or under a written separation agreement.
  • There were no contributions to your Spousal RRSP during the year of the request and the two previous years.
  • There were no withdrawals from your Spousal RRSP during the year of the request.

Otherwise, the Spousal RRSP maintains its status until the above conditions are met. Otherwise, the Spousal RRSP maintains its status until the above conditions are met.

We need the applicable transfer form, completed and signed, to transfer the entitlement value directly to another plan (as we detail in the step-by-step section above). Once we get the form, we send a cheque straight to the receiving financial institution, payable to the receiving plan.

A few good reads

What is estate planning?

Estate planning. Also known as: Writing down what you want to happen—to you, your loved ones, your money, and your stuff—in case of the unexpected. To make it easy, we’ve made you a playlist.
Read the viewpoint